Frequently Asked Questions

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What is ‘Rider Error’ ?

  • ‘Rider error’ is a term we use to describe when a rider is attempting a trick and fails to land successfully or cleanly.
  • It is very rare for a scooter to break when the rider is simply riding along a flat surface and not trying a trick. Almost all scooter tricks require than the scooter and rider get airbourne at some stage.
  • Failing to stop before hitting a stationary object is considered ‘rider error’.
  • Wheels were designed to spin around, not go sideways. Any tricks going sideways may damage the wheel tire (PU).  When the PU separates from the rim, we call that ‘De-hubbed’.  When a piece of the PU breaks off, we call that ‘chunked’. There is no warranty on de-hubbed or chunked wheels that show signs of a severe sideways impact.  
  • Bearings are again designed to spin around, not go sideways. They were not designed to be used in the wet. There is no warranty on bearings that are inside wheels which show signs of a severe sideways impact. There is no warranty on bearings that show signs of being used in the rain. Bearings do not require to be sprayed with any lubricants. There is no warranty on bearings which show they have been sprayed with some lubricant.
  • Bars can bend and break. Chromolly bars are stronger than Alloy bars. Alloy bars are lighter than chromolly bars. ‘Flyout’ is the most common reason for breaking bars. ‘Flyout’ consists of the rider flying out of a park feature and landing down on the flat ground with little or no forward speed. This flat landing means all the downwards pressure and weight of the rider is transferred directly to the bars, the deck or both.  This is the most common cause for bending bars. The next most common cause is riders letting their scooter go. So they attempt a trick but end up letting go of their scooter and it flies of landing down on the ground. The third most common cause is loose headsets/clamps or compression, allowing the bars to move back and forth, this can sometimes provide enough momentum that bars will bend by the clamp. Warranty claims are taken on a case by case basis.
  • Decks are not indestructible. ‘Flyout’ is again the most common cause for deck problems. Most decks have a limited warranty due to ‘Flyout’.  Most common deck issue is cracking around the head tube welds. In some decks a crack is not a problem, in others it is not desirable however it is just a stress crack and does not necessarily mean the deck will break into two pieces, the crack gets bigger then it is likely it will eventually break. Next common issue is bent decks, where the flat deck itself bends like a banana, again this is mostly caused from flyout tricks and heavy landings. Third issue is grinding, where the rider has grinded the deck so many times it has either worn through the metal or bent the ends/sides of the deck. This is considered wear and tear. The last notable issue with decks is when riders run loose axles and the axle slowly wears away holes in the deck distorting the holes, this can lead to wheels being on an angle or rubbing. Warranty claims are taken on a case by case basis.
  • Forks can bend. Landing on just the front wheel is the most common way to bend a fork. Again flyout tricks are the leading cause for bent forks. Incorrectly fitted or loose forks are the next most common reason for bent forks. If the compression system is incorrectly fitted or running loose, then this may cause the forks to bend on impact. Lastly letting you scooter go flying into the air while attempting a trick, and letting it smash on the ground may bend your forks. Warranty claims are taken on a case by case basis.
  • Headsets are delicate. They are basically small bearings rolling around inside a small casing. A clicking headset is mostly due to two reasons, firstly the compression has been over tightened or si running loose and the headset has been squashed. Or the bearings cases are dirty. Most headsets are sealed or semi sealed, there is no reason why you should be applying any lubricate to your headset (unless it is an open bearing headset, where a small amount of grease can be applied).  A build up of dirt can often cause the clicking noises and a simply clean and refit will solve the clicking. Do not spray/apply lubricants to sealed headsets, the lubricant simply attracts dust and dirt to the casing.

What are the most common breakages due to rider error?

  • Wheels were designed to spin around, not go sideways. Any tricks going sideways may damage the wheel tire (PU).  When the PU separates from the rim, we call that ‘De-hubbed’.  When a piece of the PU breaks off, we call that ‘chunked’. There is no warranty on de-hubbed or chunked wheels that show signs of a severe sideways impact.  
  • Bearings are again designed to spin around, not go sideways. They were not designed to be used in the wet. There is no warranty on bearings that are inside wheels which show signs of a severe sideways impact. There is no warranty on bearings that show signs of being used in the rain. Bearings do not require to be sprayed with any lubricants. There is no warranty on bearings which show they have been sprayed with some lubricant.
  • Bars can bend and break. Chromolly bars are stronger than Alloy bars. Alloy bars are lighter than chromolly bars. ‘Flyout’ is the most common reason for breaking bars. ‘Flyout’ consists of the rider flying out of a park feature and landing down on the flat ground with little or no forward speed. This flat landing means all the downwards pressure and weight of the rider is transferred directly to the bars, the deck or both.  This is the most common cause for bending bars. The next most common cause is riders letting their scooter go. So they attempt a trick but end up letting go of their scooter and it flies of landing down on the ground. The third most common cause is loose headsets/clamps or compression, allowing the bars to move back and forth, this can sometimes provide enough momentum that bars will bend by the clamp. Warranty claims are taken on a case by case basis.
  • Decks are not indestructible. ‘Flyout’ is again the most common cause for deck problems. Most decks have a limited warranty due to ‘Flyout’.  Most common deck issue is cracking around the head tube welds. In some decks a crack is not a problem, in others it is not desirable however it is just a stress crack and does not necessarily mean the deck will break into two pieces, the crack gets bigger then it is likely it will eventually break. Next common issue is bent decks, where the flat deck itself bends like a banana, again this is mostly caused from flyout tricks and heavy landings. Third issue is grinding, where the rider has grinded the deck so many times it has either worn through the metal or bent the ends/sides of the deck. This is considered wear and tear. The last notable issue with decks is when riders run loose axles and the axle slowly wears away holes in the deck distorting the holes, this can lead to wheels being on an angle or rubbing. Warranty claims are taken on a case by case basis.
  • Forks can bend. Landing on just the front wheel is the most common way to bend a fork. Again flyout tricks are the leading cause for bent forks. Incorrectly fitted or loose forks are the next most common reason for bent forks. If the compression system is incorrectly fitted or running loose, then this may cause the forks to bend on impact. Lastly letting you scooter go flying into the air while attempting a trick, and letting it smash on the ground may bend your forks. Warranty claims are taken on a case by case basis.
  • Headsets are delicate. They are basically small bearings rolling around inside a small casing. A clicking headset is mostly due to two reasons, firstly the compression has been over tightened or si running loose and the headset has been squashed. Or the bearings cases are dirty. Most headsets are sealed or semi sealed, there is no reason why you should be applying any lubricate to your headset (unless it is an open bearing headset, where a small amount of grease can be applied).  A build up of dirt can often cause the clicking noises and a simply clean and refit will solve the clicking. Do not spray/apply lubricants to sealed headsets, the lubricant simply attracts dust and dirt to the casing.

What do we consider wear and tear?

  • Grip tape is considered a consumable. Depending on the shoes you wear, the amount of tail whips, the weather and the cleanliness of grip tape, its life is determined by its use. There is no warranty on grip tape.
  • Bar grips are considered consumables. They will wear out and some wear quicker when ridden wet, or with sweaty hands, or have been ripped by throwing the scooter down. There is no warranty on grips.
  • Brakes are consumables. Most brakes are ‘flexi’ brakes and are made with a single bent piece of metal, each time they are bent, they effectively weaken until they break. Also riders landing heavy on their brake can cause them to break.
  • Wheels wear down at varying speeds, depending on the surface ridden, and if tricks are performed or the brake is heavily used.  If I wheel forms a flat spot, this is either due to slamming on the brake or failing to land a trick. The only warranty on wheels is for ‘du-hubbed’ PU which show no signs of sideways impact.
  • Bearings get dirty and sometimes wet, they also are not designed for sideways impact, so when used in this manner they will get noisy and slow down.
  • Paint scratches and chips are considered wear and tear, Considering that scooters are ridden predominantly on concrete, the painted and polished surfaces are subject to damage.
  • Rounded out bolts is a never ending problem with scooters. Riders using the wrong tools or over tightening bolts is 99.9% of the reason why bolt heads strip and round out. It is not a manufacturing fault.